Several studies reveal that haritaki may have the ability to lower high cholesterol. A study published in the 2010 issue of the “Journal of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research” showed that this herb helped in reducing the total cholesterol levels in mice. It was also found that haritaki helped in lowering the levels of triglycerides. The cholesterol lowering properties of haritaki makes it a potential remedy for lowering your risks of heart diseases, strokes and other diseases that may be brought about by the accumulation of cholesterol in the blood vessels.


Before we discuss Haritaki and enlightenment, we need to understand what enlightenment is. Enlightenment has been described and defined in many different ways. My definition may differ from others, and feel free to add your comments and suggestions at the comments portion at the bottom of the page. Enlightenment for me is the ability to be in joy, bliss, ecstasy seven days a week and 24 hours per day. In this space life is a constant flow. Events happen that can be unexpected, that can be even physically painful but the inner space of joy remains.  Events that would have been emotionally shattering before the space of enlightenment, now become events that touch the heart and increase compassion. For instance, the death of a loved one could have been devastating and debilitating previously, but now the passing of a loved one only sparks feelings of love, deep appreciation and more joy.
According to a study published in the 2009 issue of “Cell Biochemistry and Function”, Haritaki may be effective in fighting oxidative stress because of its antioxidant properties. Test were conducted on aging rats and the results showed  that using haritaki for treatment helped in improving the  levels of several powerful antioxidants such as vitamin C, vitamin E, glutathione and superoxide dismutase. These results suggest that haritaki may be helpful in protecting your body against conditions caused by oxidative stress such as aging and many diseases like cancer.
In Tibetan literature, the different parts of the Haritaki tree has been used for a special therapeutic purpose. The roots clear the diseases of the bone, the stem clears muscle diseases, the bark is useful for skin diseases, the branches are useful in vascular disorders, leaves are useful for visceral diseases, and the fruit for vital organs, including heart diseases.[5]
*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Banyan Botanicals products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. The information on this website is for educational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. For more information pertaining to your personal needs please see a qualified health practitioner.
5] Instead of Tea or Coffee prepare a decoction from the equal parts of stem of Guduchi (Tinospora cordifolia), fruit of Neem, leaf of snakeguard, and Triphala. A dose of 14 to 28 ml should be taken twice/day. Take it only after cooling down to the room temperature. If you dont find the taste of above one, try this second option - prepare a decoction of equal parts of dried ginger, fruit of coriander, and leaf of snakeguard. A dose of 14 to 28 ml should be taken twice/day, keep in mind if you are mixing sugar- dont boil the sugar.
Organic Haritaki Plus (chebulic myrobalan, terminalia chebula, and kadukkai) comes in both powder and capsule form, we recommend the capsule form as the powder can be quite bitter for those who are not used to it. The capsules come as 90 to a bottle. It is recommended that for maximum benefit you take 3 capsules per day at bedtime. The bottle with 90 capsules gives you a supply for a month. We recommend that you plan to subscribe to automatic reorder for the capsules so that you have a regular supply.
A study was performed on effect of herb in diabetic patients, the water extract of dry Haritaki at as dose of 200 mg/kg body weight was given is was found that it improved the glucose tolerance,  indicated by 44% of reduction in the peak blood glucose at 2nd hour in glucose tolerance test in diabetic (streptozotocin induced) rats (Murali YK et al., Indian Journal of Clinical Biochemistry, 2004) [1]
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Thanks for your comments. I gleaned the material of the article from what are to me ‘native’ sources — books and journals in Bengali and Hindi. That chebulic myrobalan also helps in cervical spondylitis is a new piece of information for me. Thank you! I have seen people slowly chewing a single dried fruit after meals and that helps. I have tried it and it has a bitter/astringent taste which most people may not like. If you can procure the dried fruit, just wash it and keep a piece of fruit in your mouth after meals. The hard seed inside the fruit may not be chewable but you’ll find that the wrinkled outer flesh and skin may be consumed. A convenient way to take chebulic myrobalan, and what I follow, is to have a teaspoonful of Triphala powder with water after dinner. TRIPHALA (literally ‘three fruits’) is an Ayurvedic formula that is commercially produced and one of its constituents is chebulic myrobalan. It has many health benefits and I hope you will be able to find it where you live. I have checked and it appears that Triphala powder can be found at many online retailers. Wish you all the best.
From all that I am finding out about Haritaki it appears the ancients knew how to use it very effectively. When in full health is present haritaki increases sexual health to the point of being an aphrodisiac. When health is weakened it is not of help, instead increasing health issues that are unwelcome. My recommendation: Stay healthy and enjoy all the many benefits of haritaki.

This blog only gives a simple sketch of haritaki—this is by no means comprehensive. We would very much enjoy whiling away the rest of the day discussing the many other qualities, actions, and mysteries of this super fruit, but discussing an herb only goes so far—haritaki can teach you far better than we ever could. Try it for yourself and witness the abundant benefits unfold in your own body-mind. How will you incorporate “the king of medicine” into your life? What will “the divine fruit” teach you?
As I point out above, this herb has been credited with massive changes in brain function. These changes also result in an increase in mystical abilities. The results of these changes have been noticed to produce the following outcomes: Thousands of adults and children are expressing the ability to read blindfolded. I was recently at a 21-day meditation retreat in Thailand with 800 people attending. We were introduced to children who take the yogic super brain food on a regular basis. These children displayed remarkable spiritual powers. They were able to read through a blindfold quite comfortably, at a pace equal to an adult reading with their physical eyes. Given different books in different languages, they were able to spell out the words, even though they did not know their meaning. Blindfold vision expands to extraordinary levels. I had the opportunity to test and film some of the children who can read blindfold. This is what I saw.
Abhaya, pathya, prapathya, putana, amrita, jaya, avyatha, hemvati, vaystha, chetaki, siva, pranda, nandini, rohini and vijya all are synonyms of haritaki. Haritaki is astringent, sour, pungent, bitter and sweet in taste. It pacifies all three dosha, it is laghu, beneficial for eyes and induce purgation. The herb is used to cure polyuria, leprosy, ulcers, emesis, edema, gout and dysuria. It acts as carminative, beneficial for heart and used to cure all diseases associated with obesity.
The deciduous Haritaki tree grows at an altitude of 1,800 meters. The round tree is crowned and braches spread out, with a diameter of 1.5 to 2.5 meters. The long ovate leaves are acute, in opposite pairs about 10 to 20 cm long. The flowers are dull white with spikes and can be found at the end of the branches. The fruit is hard and yellowish green in color. Each fruit has a single seed that is light yellow in color. The tree can be found in the sub Himalayan tracks, from Ravi to West Bengal and in the deciduous forests of Madhya Pradesh, Bihar, Assam and Maharashtra. It is known as haritaki, abhaya and pathya in Sanskrit; harad in Hindi; hirada in Marathi; alalekaayi in Kannada; kadukkai in Tamil; horitoky in Bengali; xilikha in Assamese and karakkaya in Telugu.
Haritaki is believed to be a helpful remedy for people suffering from overweight or obesity. This herb has appetite controlling abilities. It promotes digestion, cleanses the stomach, improves the metabolism of food and its assimilation in the stomach and also helps in increasing the metabolic rate of the body. As the metabolic rate increases, the energy expenditure of the body also increases. Haritaki also helps in the improved utilization of the stored fat in the body by increasing the secretion of bile. All these properties not only help in promoting weight loss but also help in maintaining a healthy weight.
Organic Haritaki Plus comes in both powder and pill kind, we suggest the pill type as the powder can be fairly bitter for those who are not used to it. The capsules come in a bottle. It is suggested that for optimum benefit you take pills per day at bedtime. The bottle capsules provide you a supply for a month. We recommend that you plan to sign up for automatic reorder for the pills so that you have a regular supply.
5] Instead of Tea or Coffee prepare a decoction from the equal parts of stem of Guduchi (Tinospora cordifolia), fruit of Neem, leaf of snakeguard, and Triphala. A dose of 14 to 28 ml should be taken twice/day. Take it only after cooling down to the room temperature. If you dont find the taste of above one, try this second option - prepare a decoction of equal parts of dried ginger, fruit of coriander, and leaf of snakeguard. A dose of 14 to 28 ml should be taken twice/day, keep in mind if you are mixing sugar- dont boil the sugar.
Contraindications can include diarrhea, dysentery, and if you are pregnant or nursing. There are no known drug interactions with the herbs that make up triphala.1, 6 Some studies do report findings that would advise caution in people taking blood-thinning medicines,7, 8 as triphala may affect platelet function. From an Ayurvedic perspective, if your stools are dry and hard, consider using haritaki in place of triphala.
Haritaki Plus, likewise referred to as chebulic myrobalan, terminalia chebula, and kadukkai has lots of benefits. In the Ayurveda system it is the king of herbs recommended for all health concerns. It also understood for its benefit to increase brain performance, boost longevity, activate the third eye and instinct. It is a wonderful tool for enlightenment.
Antineoplastic agents: Based on an in vitro study, a 70% methanol extract of Terminalia chebula fruit may decrease cell viability, inhibit cell proliferation, and induce cell death in a dose-dependent manner in several malignant cell lines (37). Based on animal study, Terminalia chebula may prevent ferric nitrilotriacetic acid (Fe- NTA)-induced renal tumorigenesis in Wistar rats (38), and Triphala (a combination of Terminalia chebula, Terminalia bellerica, and Emblica officinalis) may reduce benzo(a)pyrene-induced forestomach papillomagenesis in mice (39).
In Brang-ti-pa, a Tibetan literature as quoted in Shel phreng, the variety Rnam par rgyal ba (Vijaya) is characterized by closed lips and a fine neck, Gser mdog (Knaka Varna) is of golden color, round shaped, and contains five or eight ridges (Wrinkles). Sa Chen (Mamsala) is fleshy. Bigs byed (Vindkya) is black and stoneless, and Snung (Suksma) has many wrinkles.[5]
”T. chebula has been reported to exhibit a variety of biological activities including anti-viral anti-bacterial, anti-diabetic, renoprotective, radioprotective, antioxidant and adaptogenic activity. Chemical constituents of Terminalia species have been identified as tannins, flavonoids, sterols, amino acids, fructose, resin and fixed oils. In varying compositions, compounds like anthraquinones, gallic acid, chebulinic and chebulagic acid, ellagic and ethaedioic acid, 4, 2, 4 chebulyl- β-D-glucopyranose, terpinenes and terpineols have been described for this species. It can be concluded that T. chebula posse’s significant immunomodulatory activity.”
We don’t simply 'supply Ayurvedic products', but we live it, eat it, and breathe it. Ayurveda is all we do and, in our opinion, we confidently do it well. Our passion for premium and safe products has encouraged us to open 2 full time offices in India where the products are prescreened for purity and safety before export can be considered. Our offices are on the cutting edge of herbs, new formulas, and Ayurvedic breakthroughs that allow our customers to be the first ones informed on any new findings. Having our offices in India also allows us to purchase our herbs at the peak harvest season for each particular herb.
In Brang-ti-pa, a Tibetan literature as quoted in Shel phreng, the variety Rnam par rgyal ba (Vijaya) is characterized by closed lips and a fine neck, Gser mdog (Knaka Varna) is of golden color, round shaped, and contains five or eight ridges (Wrinkles). Sa Chen (Mamsala) is fleshy. Bigs byed (Vindkya) is black and stoneless, and Snung (Suksma) has many wrinkles.[5]
To give you an idea of medicinal potency, here is a non-definitive list of the active compounds found in Haritaki – Tannic acid (universal detoxifier) gallic acid (anti-viral) chebulinic acid (an ellagitannin), stearic acid (long-chain fatty acid) behenic acid (great for skin) oleic acid (lowers blood pressure and generates brain myelin) sennoside (constipation relief) arachidic acid (immune response) and linoleic acid (Omega 3).
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